2017: THE YEAR HOLLYWOOD DIED

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2017: The Year Hollywood Died

It’s 2017 and Hollywood isn’t celebrating. Donald Trump won the election and a large meltdown ensued. But something else is happening among the Hollywood scene. Movie ticket sales have hit a 19-year low, music and album sales are down, and studios are less valuable now than they were two decades ago. So what’s happening?

Hollywood enters 2017 struggling for survival in a rapidly changing world. Entertainment has moved to online and streaming, fewer people frequent the theaters, and there is a declining interest in celebrity life. The Kardashians aren’t plastered on the cover of a tabloid every single week; Miley Cyrus isn’t changing her gender pronoun again; and there are fewer-than-ever breakout stars. The condition of the music industry is even worse than film. Numerous singers and rappers have seen profits tumble while awards shows like the Grammys are bringing in fewer viewers. In 2016, the music industry brought in a paltry $7.7 billion in profits, about half of the $16 billion it made in 1999. And the profit trajectory is slated to continue downward as fewer people are paying for overpriced music.

Its rapid decline prompted Vanity Fair to produce a 2017 article speculating that Hollywood is following in the same footsteps as the book industry and newspapers. Print books have entered crisis mode as digital offers cheaper prices, and print newspaper advertising revenue fell from $67 billion in 2000 to $19.9 billion as more advertisers shifted online. Now we see the very real transition away from Hollywood entertainment. More people are finding free entertainment on Youtube, where content creators are massively outpacing billion-dollar studios in popularity.

Numbers Show Hollywood is Dying

hollywood died
Presenter at the 2017 MTV Movie and TV Awards

The malaise with Hollywood can be seen in the overall ratings for many of the awards shows. The 2017 Oscars fell to its lowest ratings in many years, with a decline of 14% viewership among the key 18-49 year old demographic. In 2017 the MTV Movie and TV awards declined to one of its worst ratings ever recorded after non-binary presenters encouraged multiculturalism, diversity, and acceptance. Since Amy Schumer hosted in 2015, the MTV awards has been a platform for a glaring social justice agenda. Many viewers simply tuned out because they were disinterested. Or, perhaps, they were offended by perverted content the program has promoted in the past, such as the 2016 performance of “When Leo Got F*cked by a Bear.”

People are generally sick of what Hollywood has become, and that is a wildly liberal, agenda-driven cesspool that uses music and film to influence the masses.

No more epics like Ben-Hur, Lawrence of Arabia, The Godfather, or The Matrix, now viewers are subject to culturally diverse films like the 2017 remake of Beauty and the Beast, and the 2016 feminist disaster known as Ghostbusters. Why is Hollywood insistent on shoving social justice down the throats of everybody all the time?

Because they have an agenda.

Six companies preside over 90% of the television and media that Americans consume daily. These same six companies also own the major film studios in the U.S. For example, Time Warner, parent company of CNN, owns Warner Bros. Pictures. And they’re pushing the same agenda on television that they’re pushing in the cinema: diversity, multiculturalism, deviant sexuality, a gender ‘spectrum’, and feminism. Viacom, Sony, Disney, and Comcast are all doing the same thing.

Perhaps the rapidly downward trajectory of Hollywood isn’t so much about the move of entertainment to online streaming content nor is it about pirated movies and music that are eating into profits. Perhaps it is about the fatigue America has with activist Hollywood.

Film just can’t be film anymore, appreciated for its beauty and artistry. A song just can’t be a song. An awards show just can’t be an awards show. Rather, it’s an opportunity to push acceptance of sexual deviance and diversity. And this same trend in Hollywood can be broadened to other sectors in America. Why can’t we just talk about sports instead of equal rights ESPN? Why can’t we just enjoy a coffee without feeling badgered about social acceptance Starbucks? Why can’t we watch a television program without bombardment from the transgender agenda Dove?

The election of Donald Trump was good for a lot of reasons, most notably that it was the ultimate violation of Hollywood and elite safe spaces. Hollywood millionaires, for the first time in many years, melted down. And it was a beautiful sight to behold. 

For far too long Hollywood has been a control mechanism of the elites to manipulate the American people, but now they’re losing their stranglehold. People are opting out of movies, no longer paying for music, tuning out of awards show, and ceasing to buy celebrity tabloids. People are dropping ESPN subscriptions, switching off transgender-promoting NFL, or cutting the cable cord altogether. The more you get away from their influence, the less control they have over you. And control is the key to the success of their agenda.

 

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